Monthly Archives: October 2015

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Memory Stick Speeds Explained

In a few short years since the launch of the first 4Mb flash memory card, the number of flash memory cards, aka SD Cards, available for digital cameras and other devices has exploded with a number of different formats and speeds of memory card. It’s no wonder the average person is totally baffled by this plethora of memory cards.

Not only are there different shapes (the format) and sizes of memory sticks such as Secure Digital (SD) Compact Flash, Memory Stick, etc, but also different speed ratings.

Memory card speed is the card’s performance with regard to how quickly data can be transferred to or from it. The card speed is often stated in ‘Times’ ratings i.e. 12X, 40X etc (just as the speed of recordable CD’s and DVD’s is measured), and sometimes more specifically in megabytes per second (Mb/s). By today’s measure, sub 30X represents a standard speed, 30X to 60X is mid-high speed and over 66X is high speed. The chart below shows the relationship between the two figures.

8X = 1.2 Mb/sec
12X = 1.8 Mb/sec (Also known as Class 2 for SD Cards)
20X = 3.0 Mb/sec
25X = 3.8 Mb/sec (Also known as Class 4 for SD Cards)
30X = 4.5 Mb/sec
40X = 6.0 Mb/sec (Also known as Class 6 for SD Cards)
60X = 9.0 Mb/sec
66X = 10.0 Mb/sec (Also known as Class 10 for SD Cards)
80X = 12.0 Mb/sec
90X = 15.0 Mb/sec
133X = 20.0 Mb/sec

Why do we need different or higher speeds cards?
This is mainly due to the advancement of our digital devices, especially digital cameras, camcorders and music devices. As manufacturers develop higher and higher spec devices (i.e. higher resolution cameras and more intense multi-media functions), they are creating increasingly larger amounts information to store pictures, movies, music and so on. This in turn takes longer to record onto the memory card. For example if you have ever used a high megapixel camera with a standard speed card you may have noticed the time lag between pressing the shutter button and being able to take the next picture. This lag or delay, in most cases, is caused by a slow write speed. Similarly, copying your photos to your PC could take time too and is caused by a slow read speed.
So who really needs high-speed memory cards?
Professional photographers and enthusiasts using professional grade cameras such as digital SLR’s should use high-speed memory cards of at least 40X speed. If you own a camera with a megapixel rate above ten million pixels, you will certainly benefit from a card with a higher speed rating. If you’re like most of us using a compact camera under ten million pixels, you’ll get great performance from standard cards with 25X or more.

Those using digital camcorders and devices recording MP3 music or video will also benefit from higher speed cards. It used to be where very few people would actually benefit from very high-speed cards. Typically only professionals who used expensive, specialized products benefited, but it’s fast becoming a requirement on many of the latest PDA’s, Cameras, phones and other mobile devices to make use of the extra speed made available by high speed cards.

People using high speed memory cards with equipment that has been on the market a while may not notice any difference in performance, but this has more to do with the limitations of the device than the flash card itself. This is because not only does your memory card have a maximum speed rating, but your camera or mobile phone will also have its own speed rating. When these products are combined, they’ll work at the “slowest common denominator” e.g. if you use a 12X flash card in a camera with a designed for a maximum of 8X speed, you’ll be transferring data at the slower 8X speed.

You should always check the capacity of your device before splurging on mega fast cards, but determining the speed compatibility of your device can be tricky. Most manuals just don’t tell you what speed of flash card you should use, now that would be far too easy, but they do tell you to buy their brand, which isn’t much help! So a general rule of thumb, if your camera is less than three megapixels the speed rating of the flash card doesn’t matter much. Most modern cameras have the ability to support far higher speeds than the cards available to purchase today, therefore, if speed is of importance, go for a faster card. Most mobile phones are fine with standard speed cards although some newer models will benefit from higher speed cards but not generally over 60X speeds. Hope this info helps you pick your next SD Card wisely.

 


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Why you Need to Keep your Computer Clean

If your computer is used a lot and kept on for hours at a time, it’s a good idea to clean it every now and again. Dirty computers often do not run as fast as they are advertised to and have a lower life expectancy than ones that re well kept and cleaned often. One of the main problems keeping your computer form running at its optimal speed is dust. Dust inhibits the fans form properly cooling the computer parts and often leads to hardware failure. Dust is also conductive, so in theory it could short circuit your computer and cause it to not work any more.

If you have a desktop computer, then the main place dust accumulates is around the CPU unit and fan areas. To prevent your processor from overheating, there is a fan connected to a heatsink which sits on top of the processor to disperse the heat. This fan blows air down in to the heat sink to cool it down as the heat is passed up from the CPU into the heatsink. Because the fan is constantly blowing in air, it also blows the dust particles from the air in to the heat sink. Over time this can clog up the computer’s heat sink, reducing its effectiveness. Because of the dust, the fans ionside of the computer may have to blow faster to maintain the same temperature on the actual processor. This makes your computer louder and more costly to run. Normally, you can see if the fan is clogged up simply by opening your computer up and looking at it. If your fan’s heat sink is really clogged up with dust, it is a good idea to give it a clean. When dealing with the inside of your computer, or anything electrical for that matter, ensure the power is turned off and your computer is unplugged first.

The best way to clean out the insides of your computer is by using a can of compressed air that includes a special nozzle. This special nozzle is a long plastic straw that protrudes from the sprayer. This tool allows you to reach into very small spaces and clean without having to take apart your computer.  You can buy this from any electronics retailer. When spraying the compressed air on to your computer, make sure you don’t spray it for to long as condensation may form some drops of water. When you spray compressed air, the air is very cold. this cools down the parts of the computer and if you spray the air on one place too long, condensation could form. As we all know water plus electronics equals bad results. After blowing away any dust from your computer’s heatsinks, give it a gentle wipe over with an anti-static cloth for good measure. You can also use the compressed air to clean your power unit and keyboard.

Cleaning the inside of your computer doesn’t take long providing you have the correct equipment, and once it is done, you notice an immediate improvement in your computers performance. The fan won’t need to blow as hard, so your computer will be quieter. And thanks to the processor running at a cooler temperature, your whole computer should generally run faster. I try to clean my computer every 4 or 5 months to keep it running efficiently. Doing small things such as cleaning your computer could have lasting positive effects.