Monthly Archives: May 2016

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What is HDMI?

HDMI, or high definition multimedia interface, is a type of audio and video interface that is used for the transmission of uncompressed digital streams. Essentially, HDMI can be considered an alternative method to transmitting data streams, rather than making use of conventional methods such as coaxial cabling, VGA, or component video equipment.

What Type of Sources May Be Employed Using HDMI?

Quite a number of devices and sources on the market today will work with the use of HDMI. The Blu-Ray disc player, a relatively new innovation, was created with the use of HDMI specifically in mind. Most personal computers that are sold today are ready for use with HDMI, as are the majority of video game consoles in the stores currently. A set-top box also is usually compatible with HDMI, as are such entertainment options as digital television. Essentially, any type of computer interface today will function with the use of HDMI.

How Does HDMI Work?

HDMI will work with a single cable connection to such devices as televisions or personal computers. In general, HDMI will function fine with any television or PC that is standard, enhanced, or high definition in the video component. However, it is important to note that HDMI does work independently of many of the DTV standards, although use of HDMI will not impact the quality of the digital transmission. Generally, these standards apply to some configurations of MPEG movie clips and files. Since these are compressed, HDMI will simply decompress the data and make it possible to view the clip.

Are All HDMI Versions The Same For All Devices?

No. There is a range of specifications that are employed by HDMI, and a given device will be manufactured to comply with one of those specifications. The most simplistic specification is identified as 1.0. With each succeeding version, the capabilities of the previous version remain intact, but are joined by other capabilities that will allow the version to function with a given device. Because technology is always advancing, HDMI continues to advance as well. However, older versions remain active, as they are often used with devices that require less functionality, and they also continue to be helpful in situations where older systems are still running and are in operation.

Where Did HDMI Come From?

HDMI was created and has been enhanced by the efforts of several prominent names in the computer and electronics industry. Consumers will recognize the names of Philips, Sony, Toshiba, and Silicon Image as just part of the roster of corporations involved in the ongoing enhancement of HDMI.


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What is a Multilayer PCB?

Circuit boards make up every electronic on the market. Inside of every electronic is something called a Printed Circuit Board or PCB.

A PCB is basically a piece of copper covered fiberglass that is submerged in acid until a pattern is etched out that connects multiple electronic components.

A Multilayer PCB consists of multiple layers of electronic components placed over each other.

Through-hole construction was the technology that was used to deal with planting the electrical components through the holes on the Printed Board Curcuit and then soldering them together. When this technology was found wanting in complex cases, Point-to-Point construction technology evolved. This proved to be better than its predecessor, but in no way is it comparable to a multilayer PCB. The development of multilayer PCB has allowed electronic companies to drastically cut down on the cost and size of their products.

The functionality of a multilayer Printed Board Circuit depends on the internal connections between the various components that make up the entire device. Until and unless these components work in tandem, the device is non-functional. In the case of most technology, the urge to improve product performance makes the products bulky, whereas the flexible design of the multilayer PCBs has entirely replaced the rigid single-layered PCB design. The high-class wiring and the flexible parts have improved the performance of many products, especially automated and complex devices such as computers and cellular phones. Technology today has come a long way, culminating in the manufacture of multilayer PCBs that can contain as many as twenty-four layers, depending on usage and the complexity of the product itself. Multilayered PCBs have also facilitated the ease of manufacturing, since most of them are pre-mounted and prefabricated. Although manufacturing these prefabricated multilayered PCBs is a complex process, the final stage has now become a matter of assembly rather than manufacturing.

Any discussion of this technology would be incomplete without mentioning the tools and materials that are required for using a multilayer PCB. These are:

*Powerful drill

*Copper etcher

*Laminating press

*Copper plating cell

*And most importantly – a well-ventilated area

The reasons behind the development of the multilayer PCB are numerous, although some may think the technology was unnecessary while standard PCBs were doing fine. As discussed earlier, a multilayer PCB has a more flexible structure and can considerably reduce the size of the device. This is not the only reason. The cost of production using conventional PCBs was very high and costs only increased with new developments. By contrast, a multilayer PCB, in addition to providing revolutionary on-board components, more often than not needs only reprogramming. Moreover, mass production has become easier due to prefabricated multilayered PCBs. Instant installation or assembly of multilayer PCBs means electronic companies have definitely experienced a rise in their production rates.

In case you are wondering about the longevity or quality of these circuit boards, they are very well packaged and can be left as they are for future use. Once each board is completed, it is thoroughly tested to make sure that it functions properly. In cases of failure, the repair process is easy and can be achieved by replacing the board itself instead of resorting to component-level troubleshooting.